History of Tisane

Tisane (pronounced tee-zahn) has many claimed origins, some sources credit the term coming from the Greek word ptisanē (originally referring to a beverage made from the crushed grains of pearl barley). Others refer to the French as coining the term, one could argue that Ti (Tea) and Sans (French for “without”) or Ti (Tea) and…

History of Pu’er Tea

The Pu’er tea consists of two completely different categories. One is called “Raw Pu’er Tea” and another is “Ripe Pu’er Tea”. Raw Pu’er tea has a very long history and it was the tea traded through The Ancient Tea Route. Raw Pu’er tea is also the tea that many tea collectors are enthusiastically searching for….

History of Oolong Tea

Oolong is a traditional Chinese tea somewhere between green (no oxidation) and black (fully oxidised) teas in oxidation. Therefore, it is known as semi-oxidised or partially oxidised. The camellia sinensis plant is where not only Oolong tea comes from, but where green, black and white tea comes from too. Oolong tea, so named after its…

History of White Tea

White tea leaves are picked shortly before the buds have fully opened and is therefore made from immature leaves; tea leaves are processed less than green tea leaves, so instead of air-drying, the unwithered leaves are merely steamed. This results in a place tea with a sweet, silky flavour. The silver fuzz that still covers…

History of Black Tea

Until the mid-17th century (late Ming, early Qing Dynasty), the only teas consumed in China were Green (un-oxidised) and Oolong (semi-oxidised) teas. The tale goes that while a passing army entered the Fujian Province, they decided to take shelter at a nearby tea factory. This held up production at the factory and leaves were left…

History of Green Tea

Tea was discovered in its greenest form over five thousand years ago; some versions of history depict a flower falling into a cup of hot water, while another has a man eating a leaf and realising how delicious it would be steeped in water. For centuries, all tea was green tea. Green tea is simply…

Introduction to Tea

The most widely accepted non-alcoholic beverage in the world is tea, with over three million tonnes are grown annually. In the UK alone 165,000,000 cups of tea are drunk every day, accounting for 40% of our daily fluid intake. Tetley alone buys 1,000 kg of tea every week, and sells 60 different tea blends, where…